BONES 10×17&10×18 Debriefing: “Later Is Not a Guarantee”

(c) FOX

FOX aired two al- new Bones episodes tonight, both dealing, one way or another, with various people pondering their future and their lives in crime-fighting — are all the risks and everything that has happened in the past year(s) worth it?

Nonetheless, I was glad to have two hours of the show back-to-back, especially since both episodes/cases were so solid. This last third of the season is proving to be really strong.

[Note: as I mentioned last week, the next few days are going to be pretty crazy for me: I’m in the process of packing up a whole apartment and I’ll be travelling a lot in the next week; hence, the shorter reviews for each episode. Without further ado…]

It’s the kinda ending you don’t really wanna see…

“The Lost in the Found,” penned by Emily Silver, bowled me over.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

When I read the press release while preparing the stills posts, I had the feeling the case would be special, but this was even more touching. (Knowing this was dedicated to her cousin resonates even more with me.)

In the episode, the team investigates the murder of Molly Denson, a bright 16-year old prep school student found in a ditch in the woodlands. Among the suspects, there is the pervert drug-dealer who found her body (he also had a history of sleeping with underage girls), her parents (though the abuse markers turned to be due to Molly’s weight) and three students at her school who bullied her.

As usual, the case plays out as it would in any other episode: the more evidence is gathered, the more the team pictures what happens — in this case, it all seems to point towards the three “mean girls” at Pemberley, as Arianna’s car, Kathryn’s beads and Cayla’s scissors (the murder weapon) are in the scene… However, they claim they were passed out in Kathryn’s room after drinking booze with Molly.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

Additionally, Brennan feels a connection to this case, as she relates to what Molly was going through. In a fantastic scene with Angela, she reveals she felt as isolated as Molly, thinking she would never find a life she enjoyed living (but she has now!). Yet, after the scene at Pemberley with the three girls, she’s bothered by how their story doesn’t make sense.

But evidence can tell more than one story. So late at night, she goes back to the lab (and so does the team) to look at the evidence once again. Relating it to her own denial/delusion about her pregnancy (more on this in a second), she realizes that they were so focused on thinking it was a murder that they didn’t pay attention to some discrepancies — the cause of death was very creepy, and there are no fractures on her left hand (she was left handed)…

She killed herself; she was lost and in pain. She used the pills she bought from Tyler (the pervert guy) and put them in the girls’ drinks so they couldn’t account for their time; she got the injection from her parents (they are dentists) to stay cogent while she finished the job … She was depressed and suicidal and couldn’t disappoint her parents, and the bullying pushed her over the edge. In a final comeback, she tried to frame her tormentors for her death.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

But enough about the details — it’s all the emotion from that final scene, in which Brennan further identifies with her but comments on how she wishes Molly hadn’t convinced herself suicide was the way out. (It is not, but I guess the pain might be too much to bear.)

What a poignant storyline, honestly. I had the feeling Molly’s was a suicide from the beginning (even if the evidence threw me off for awhile), but the episode followed it along really well. I can’t say I completely relate to Molly, but I saw parts of me reflected in her. I’m sad her pain was so unbearable she had to end it all. Moreover, I like that Brennan related to her — not as extremely as she did in “The Doctor in the Photo” but enough to make it heart-rending — allowing us another peek into her past. As Brennan said, it’s a shame that Molly didn’t have a chance to realize she could eventually have a great life too.

Elsewhere…

* Brennan is in denial about how pregnant she is — she keeps saying 3 months pregnant when everyone knows she looks and is around 6 months along. I’m not going to fight those who found this very silly but… I didn’t hate it either, even if it doesn’t make much sense to me. I feel like I was missing something — was it their way to catch up with Emily Deschanel’s bump, maybe? I don’t know if it was trying to go for laughs (in an episode that had such a somber tone) but it took me a bit to get used to what was going on. By the end of it, it amused me slightly more than it got on my nerves, though. Even if someone like Brennan should and would know how far along she was, despite all the denial.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

What sold the storyline for me was Angela and Brennan’s scene at the latter’s office, when the storyline’s main point is highlighted as Angela brings up the unsafe reality of Booth and Brennan’s jobs and lives. Brennan has been trying to control the uncontrollable, as Sweets would say — as happy as she is, everything could change in a second in their line of work and that is terrifying. (If I could, I’d quote this whole scene.)

By the end of the episode, Brennan admits all of this to Booth (who was also very aware of her denial, and tried to make her see the light) — how scared she is as “the more the family grows, the more we have to lose.” But as Booth replies, they will have also have more to gain. They are going to be fine — not because of faith, but because of love. As lovely as this is, Booth, you are lying about something that might complicate everything… but I do hope and think you’ll be fine.

* Is Daisy ready to dip her feet back into the dating pool? She is plagued by guilt when her hot pilates instructor hits on her/ asks her out. Throughout the episode, she ponders fair questions on whether she’s ready to start dating and whether if that’d be respectful to Sweets, when she should reveal she’s a “single widow mother” et al. By the end-ish of the episode, we know she is not sleeping with him yet… but she is probably slowly easing into dating.

Odds and Ends

  • The scene with Hodgins, Daisy and Brennan in which the ladies update him on their storylines decisions/realizations was gold, if only because of his reaction.
  • Molly’s life was absolutely terrible. That hate box? That diary? All the awfulness at the prep school? I feel so bad for her.
  • I lovelovelove learning more about Brennan’s past/childhood. Always great to know more about her.
  • So… the baby was conceived in that “Brunello night,” right? At least, Booth still thinks so. And since it was six months ago, does this mean this could be another grief baby? (Or was the six months comment since Sweets died? I could take it both ways.)
  • If Booth were to be killed in the line of duty, Brennan wouldn’t sleep with anyone afterwards (at least, at the six-month mark). So sweet.
  • Both episodes had a lot of references to Sweets, highlighting the impact he had in their lives, as well as how much he’s missed. Aww.
  • Alysia Reiner played Amelia Minchin, the headmistress. She was so fantastic on OITNB,even if her character was the worst.
  • Was Pemberley a reference to Pride and Prejudice?

Later is not a guarantee

“The Verdict on the Victims,” by Nkechi Okoro Caroll was a great resolution to “The Baker in the Bits.” I said it back then, but I didn’t feel as if Rockwell was the killer (or if he was, I felt there was more to it), so this episode made me happy in that respect.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

As Brennan reviews the Rockwell case, forty-eight hours before the execution takes place, she comes to realize his shoulder injuries (as per some x-rays taken in prison) wouldn’t have allowed him to inflict one of the wounds in each of the victims. (Not so much of a slam dunk of a case, huh.) The team thus races against the clock to prove Alex Rockwell’s innocence and find the actual serial killer they are looking for. For his part, Rockwell has not only accepted his fate but has moved up the execution date; he doesn’t even want anything special for his last dinner or the last visit (however, he does write a heartfelt goodbye to his son). When Booth comes to talk to him, he remains uncooperative.

The team is coming up empty, only being able to trace it all back to Rockwell, until it dawns on Booth (while sleeping): the other killings happened every 3-4 months, and serial killers are methodical. Hence, there must have been another killing since Rockwell was incarcerated — and sure enough, this is the missing link they were missing.

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

They find the body of Tracy Taylor (the first female killed) in a similar place as the other few. Much like the others, she was getting her life together, despite undergoing many charges. (She also attended the same NA meeting as Schultz, which put him in the spotlight again.) A step in the right direction, the team determines she was killed by the same person as the other four murders, not a copycat.

However, the true missing link comes from Barnes (the first victim) —he had paid a lot of money for funeral flowers for his driver, Kyle Martin, who turns out to be Flender’s nephew. This effectively connects Flender to all five murders, who thinks of himself as a Messiah who gave a second chance to all these people.

In an exciting race against the clock, with less than an hour to go until Rockwell’s execution, Booth and Aubrey, with Brennan’s help, try to find the weapon at Flender’s home.  As Fuentes says, since the murders are ritualistic, those weapons are holy to him. Luckily, they do it just in time!

(c) FOX

(c) FOX

This episode was really interesting and maintained the tension well throughout. I particularly liked that we got to see more pieces of what they work on, e.g. arrest, execution, etc. (Only thing we truly missed was the trial.) While the case wasn’t as poignant as the previous episode’s, it was just as solid. I’m also glad the right serial killer was apprehended, too.

Elsewhere…

* Cam, Hodgins and Fuentes debate their stances on death penalty in the episode, as Rockwell finds himself facing it. The men are against it, while Cam isn’t. We also get Booth’s insight: he doesn’t believe in it anymore  — at least since he spent some time in prison himself.

* Hodgins and Angela have found what to do with their money. Much like Brennan faced her family’s future in the first episode tonight, they did on the second one. Angela has been looking at houses in Paris  to actually call home. This takes Hodgins aback, but as shown in the last scene — he’s actually considering it, and thinks she was dreaming too small: after ten years, they should let life surprise them. (Such a sweet scene!)


Odds and Ends

  • Aubrey and Christine’s scene was pretty cute! I’d love to see some of those Sunday dinners with everyone, too.
  • This episode is going to draw comparisons to Season 1’s “The Man on Death Row” but I think there are key differences: we’ve seen them work this case (and knew there had to be something else), the appeal comes from Brennan herself, etc.
  • (c) FOX

    (c) FOX

    Linda Lavin played the judge in this case. I liked how well she knew the case (though I wouldn’t expect less) and how Caroline implied Rockwell’s execution would further her career. My favorite part, though, was the picture of her and Obama in the office — that was a nice touch that probably confirms Caroline’s words. Also: she might still get what she wants if Flender is sentenced to death!

  • Faith was big in both episodes; in this one, it was particularly seen on Booth’s complete faith in Brennan. As he says at the end, “You gotta have as much faith in you as you do.”
  • Both episodes also featured great lady friendship scenes! This one had a couple of lovely Cam-Brennan scenes, including the one in which Cam brings Brennan breakfast.
  • The timeline from the last two episodes confuses me. As per 10×17, Sweets has been dead for six months (and that’s approximately how far along Brennan is); per 10×18, Rockwell has been in prison for seven months. I know time is an illusion and I’m overthinking this too much.

Anyways. Two solid episodes that made for an interesting Thursday night! I liked both were slightly darker than your usual Bones fare and had some message. Between bullying and depression, and the death penalty, both covered some serious topics in today’s world that I’m really glad the show highlighted (and did so well). Kudos to both writers!

Sorry these recaps are slightly shorter than usual; though I wanted to do that… It’s impossible for me. That will be back next week!

(For a great recap, you can check EW‘s, as usual.)

Next week: Oh man, the episode looks pretty intense. (And again, the recap might be much later than usual.)

… is a young graduate student that has been way too passionate about television ever since she was little. While she insists she doesn’t have a specific type of show, they all usually have strong but flawed lady characters, some derivation of the stubborn friends-in-love/friends-to-lovers trope, and they all make her yell at her tv a lot. She just wishes she had more hours in the day so she could actually write about this.
You can usually find her on Twitter, Tumblr, and at cassidy at thankyoulizlemon.com

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